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The Republic Day special, Let’s Focus on 5 ways to good mental health & wellbeing

This year India will celebrate its 70th Republic Day. It is on this day the Constitution of India came into effect. The Indian Constitution includes steps that the nation needs to take to make India a better place. So, as the nation takes step towards making the country better for all of us, let us bring a positive change within ourselves by knowing following ways to achieve good mental health and wellbeing.

Get adequate sleep.

psychiatrist in puneIndia being a rapidly growing economy, we are largely a sleep-deprived nation. Although some of us may consider lack of sleep a badge of honor, but poor sleep is an important contributing factor for mental illness like depression and anxiety disorders. Sleep is first thing to get disturbed in any mental illness. The best ways is to follow consistent bed time and awake time, restrict daytime sleep hours, stay way from screens, social media, etc especially in the late night hours, and regular moderate physical exercise. These are some simple steps to ensure sleep hygiene.

Exercise more.

psychologist in puneThe benefits of moderate exercise in depression is found to be as effective as antidepressant medications. Individual suffering from mental health problem may find it difficult to exercise. It may not be always a joining gym or training weights – but just do walk! Exercising not only improves your sleep but also helps you in staying more relaxed. It can boost your self esteem and body language.

Invest in a Hobby.

Reward yourself by doing activities which you enjoy. Hobbies not only promotes a sense of pleasure but also helps you to build mastery in something. It gives you a sense of achievement and feeling of self worth. Take up a hobby that helps you feel good about yourself. As you get better at it, your self esteem will also get a boost.

Keep away from your smartphone.

Social media feeds not only makes you feel anxious but also make you feel more depressed. You invariably tend to compare your life to those who are having wonderful times. Their life always looks better when you compare yours with them, and it makes you feel depressed. Take a social media holiday. Even it is for small times, take breaks from your smartphones. Decide to check feeds once every three to four hours instead, and stop altogether after 6 pm. Most importantly, stop constantly comparing yourself to others.

Start to plan your day.

Getting overwhelmed by work, can make you feel anxious and burnout. Plan your day or week by writing it down on paper the to do tasks. Make a log and track the time it takes. Having a plan will prevent you from constantly thinking about your day. With a planner, you are on track and have a sense of accomplishment.

Finally, help others. It is a great way to connect with other people and cultivate relationships. Be grateful. Practice gratitude by reflecting on the good things in your life. Give yourself a break, and be nicer to yourself.

Is New Year’s Eve the “most depressing day of the year”?

New Year’s Eve comes with a mixed feelings of relief and despair. People may find difficult to shake themselves of lingering sadness as they say goodbye to the passing year to remember its last moments.

Festivals and holidays are known to be mentally taxing. According to recent research the New Year’s Eve can even be considered as the “most depressing day of the year.”

Let us have a look about the possible factors that could make New Year’s Eve so hard on mental health.

Its emphasis on reflection is what sets New Year’s Eve/ Day apart from other holidays, and this can make it particularly upsetting. At the new year, it is difficult not to reassess and become self critical at least a bit.

Anytime when you reflect on past, can potentially make you feel more depressed. Especially if you feel like you don’t measure up in comparison to others. It is often the time when we are more likely to think or reflect upon our achievements or lack of it. Failure to reach certain goals, health issues, major professional set backs, etc particularly can feel very heavy at the end of year.

For those who have already been diagnosed with Seasonal Affective Disorder, the winter of December end can worsen unpleasant feelings and depression. There is a pressure to socialise, party, go out that can act as a stressor as those who are depressed find leaving the house difficult. Letting social convention dictate what you do rather than doing what feels best for you can risk you for anxiety and depression.

It is the day when one focusses more on future and hopes of new year to come. With low mood and morale, those who are suffering from depression may, unfortunately, be feeling more dread than hope as they look forward to the new year.

It is important to know that It’s okay to feel depressed or anxious. Sadness and anxiety are normal human emotions, but they can become dangerous if they become extremely intense and prolonged. In such a case, it is advisable simply vocalise your feelings to close ones, or seek professional help.

How To Handle A Breakup: 7 Effective Ways

Going through a break-up?

Going through a relationship breakup is like getting trapped in the stormy brain chemistry of loss and rejection. The feelings include of anxiety, depression, feelings of grief and addiction, also the desperate attempts to deal with the emotional pain of rejection; this all is a result of the drops in serotonin and dopamine levels during the phase of a relationship breakup. One would often struggle to resist the temptation to stalk, plead, and make a needy fool of oneself. The ultimate goal here is to come through this ordeal in one piece and perhaps even stronger.

Following are some healthy coping ways to help you deal with a breakup:

1) Block them from your facebook/whatsapp.

Unfollow or block them; because you need space and time to heal. Seeing your ex on Facebook wall or seeing him pop up on Whats app/Instagram, can trigger flashbacks of your past memories with your ex and can send you in obsessions of stalking him/her on social media.

2) Don’t trash-talk your ex too much.

It may feel good to talk about your ex with your best friends, and hearing them bring down someone who made you feel sad, but your happiness need not be contingent on someone else’s pain.

3) Don’t consider to “stay friends’.

During this awkward breaking-up period, its very difficult to know whether you both can be friends or not. Generally, one person wants to be friends and other wants more. You gotta work this out before it can be a healthy relationship.

4) Moderate to intense physical exercise or work out does help.

Working out can be a great stress-buster. May be some intense sport like badminton, boxing, etc. It can really help you get rid of that negative tension and physical stress.

5) Spend more time outdoors.

Make a routine where you spend at least couple of hours under sun in fresh air. Create an ex- free environment by getting rid of stuff that reminds you of your ex. Donating them is one good way to do it.

6) Deal with your emotions and not avoid them.

It’s okay to feel ‘bad’. Do not try to distract yourself or escape from whatever you are feeling, but observe your feelings gently and without judgement. The more you observe, the better you’ll know that no emotion is static or permanent.

7) Finally, stop blaming yourself.

The problem wasn’t just you, but you two as a couple. It always takes two to breakup a relationship.

Spend your time with people who appreciates you. Feel confident, optimistic, and authentic, and remember that your success is the best revenge!

 

For more information and related topics visit us onĀ www.onlymindmatters.com

What makes Football a really good sport for your Mind?

How Football affects your Mental Health?

Football benefits Mental health by giving an opportunity to have a time away from stresses and strains of life. Seeing your team do well, prompts a feeling of collective euphoria and joy.

Basking in reflected glory (BIRGing) not only lifts the mood of an individual but also of the entire community. BIRGing fans associate themselves to the success of team. Identification with the teams success enhances ones self esteem and instills a sense of accomplishment.

The perception of having such attributes makes one feel more confident and thus more desirable to others.

While watching football, fans shout, scream and chant, these ways often encourage ‘a cathartic release of tension’. It is also a socially acceptable way of venting out emotions of frustration and sadness. Young age group, in whom depression is very common and is at a highest risk for suicide, is also a dominant age group in football crowds across the country.

Watching a live game of football is like participating in group activity with people who share common values and interests. It not only provides a sense of belonging but also an identification and inclusion within a larger group.

For most fans, football is a part of their lives. However, for whom it becomes the main focus, on their team losing they can experience significant psychological problems of anxiety and depression.

Football provides a platform to gossip, communicate and exchange views, which are often known as protective factors in mental well-being. It also provides people a reason to meet up regularly, which helps them to maintain strong relationships. In particular, for those who are shy, are from different cultural and social backgrounds, football allows to connect with each other easily.

To some it can present an opportunity to re-enact their ritual of battle, which if taken too far can lead to serious violence. Such acts of violence differentiate a fan from ‘football hooligan’. An opportunity for competition, achieving ‘honor’ and inflicting shame on opponents is often a motivation behind such violent behaviour. Heavy alcohol drinking is often a key element in many violent offences by football fans.

Football as a sport can be even more beneficial to physical and mental health if taken to the field as an exercise.